Posts Tagged ‘food’

Wired_FoodieDice
15Megan Jones

Megan JonesFebruary 27, 2014

10 Exciting Crowdfunded… Foods

Cows, crickets or coconut ice cream? With food at the heart of many global challenges, from climate change to soil loss, this week we bring you 10 crowdfunding innovations you can actually eat.

1. Goodio Cools

Image: FundedByMe

The Finnish food company Goodio already makes chocolate, but they know that even in cold countries people want ice cream. With a successful equity campaign on FundedByMe, they are now getting ready to launch a dairy-free, organic ice cream made from coconuts. They promise it in four flavours – vanilla, chocolate, strawberry and mint – so stay tuned on their Facebook page for future delectation.

2. Beer52

Image: Beer52

What could be more popular than a crowdfunding campaign where the supporters get rewarded in beer? With this Scottish craft beer club, Beer52, beer-lovers can subscribe to receive monthly boxes of craft beers from around the UK. Small, local breweries get national distribution and word-of-mouth advertising, consumers get to try new products, innovators collaborate, and the world becomes merrier and slightly more intoxicated.

3. Flavourly

Image: DollyBakes

Monthly food sampling must be the next big thing, because another new start-up, Flavourly, reached its crowdfunding target within 24 hours. The equity campaign only launched on Angels Den two weeks ago, and the founders have already had to introduce a stretch goal.

Like Beer52, Flavourly is a subscription service in the UK that allows customers to discover new craft beers every month – but this time packages also include fine foods and snacks.

4. Exo

Image: edible startups

If you’ve ever been grossed out by a bug-eating contest, you might not be so excited about the UN’s recent recommendation that we should all be eating insects. On the other hand, innovators like the guys from Exo think insect protein might be more palatable without the “ick factor” of crunchy legs.

Exo protein bars are made from ground up cricket flour and other, tastier ingredients like chocolate. Eating crickets could help overcome the global food crisis, since they need much less food and water than, say, cows, have much lower GHG emissions, and reproduce faster. They also have more iron and high calcium content.

Thanks to a successful Kickstarter campaign, you can now pre-order your very own Exo bars. And let’s be honest – they’ve got to taste better than stink bugs.

5. Koopeenkoe

Image: New Scientist

Cut to the chase and get straight to the heart of things with the Dutch scheme Koopeenkoe, where customers buy beef directly from the source. The best part? A cow isn’t slaughtered until every part of it has been sold, minimising waste and maximising freshness. The cows are raised on a mostly organic diet and outside most of the time, and customers get to eat locally. The website is in Dutch, but this article explains the process in English.

6. Foodie Dice

Image: WIRED

Finally, a legitimate excuse to “play with your food”. This Kickstarter project spices up an ordinary cooking experience with an element of chance. To play, role six Foodie Dice, see what ingredients land face-up, and use all or some of them to make your meal more creative. The basic pack includes nine dice: protein, cooking method, grain/carb, herb, bonus ingredient, plus spring, summer, autumn, and winter vegetables. The bonus pack includes a wild card, spices, dessert and vegetarian protein. This campaign only finished in November, but you can already order your own Foodie Dice on the website.

7. Pizza Rossa

Image: Wikipedia

The award for best start-up of 2013 – at least on Crowdcube – goes to Pizza Rossa, a new fast-food restaurant hitting the streets of London later this year. Their campaign also beat records for largest amount of equity funding raised in the UK. Unlike Italy or New York, good pizza by the slice has apparently been hard to find in Britain – but not for much longer.

8. inSpiral Kale Chips

Image: inSpiral

Bye-bye fatty potato crisps, hello guilt-free kale chips. Wildly popular in US health food circles, this superfood is becoming increasingly mainstream in Europe. The start-up inSpiral markets their kale chips as a raw food, vegan, gluten-free, additive free, organic snack – salty, flavourful, and still good for you.

Thanks to their Crowdcube campaign, these Inspiral kale chips are now cheaper, more widely available, and sold in a 100% compostable packaging. Check out their inspir(al)ing crowdfunding pitch on Youtube.

9. Soylent

Image: Soylent

If you see cooking as a hassle you may find new happiness in Soylent, a food replacement that claims to “free your body” from food. Whether Soylent makes eating pleasurable is debatable, and some nutritionists are dubious about its health benefits. Still in its experimental phase, if more widely accepted Soylent may also help ease global hunger and malnutrition. In the meantime, its new nutrition label sheds some light on its many health-giving ingredients.

One thing is certain: Soylent’s crowdfunding campaign has been a massive success, raising around $2 million. The product should be available for wider consumption in spring 2014.

10. FundaFeast

Image: GoFundMe

Like 4D printing, crowdfunding perpetuates itself. Through GoFundMe, individuals can raise cash for their own personal projects – in this case, FundaFeast. One of the first dedicated food crowdfunding sites, FundaFeast went live on February 1st and may mark the beginning of a increase in more specialised crowdfunding platforms than the Kickstarter and Indiegogo giants.

Other food crowdfunding (foodfunding?) platforms – mostly US-based – include Credibles, where customers support local food business in exchange for credit, and Foodstart, raising money for restaurants and food trucks.

 

All of these projects sound delicious, but where are the Norwegians? If you know of a Norwegian crowdfunded food scheme, we want to hear about it!

FluorescentTobacco
15Megan Jones

Megan JonesFebruary 17, 2014

10 Exciting Crowdfunded… Gadgets

With crowdfunding, anyone can help turn the craziest of dreams into a fully functional reality. From the innovative to the sustainable to the just plain wacky, these 10 successful campaigns give a taste of the great new tech coming out of crowdfunding.

1. WakaWaka Light and Power

WakaWaka Power

Image: WakaWaka

This lamp is solar powered and super efficient, lasting for up to 80 hours. It can stand up on its own or attached to a bottle top. The WakaWaka Power, released in 2013, can also be used to charge a smartphone, MP3 player or tablet.

Even better, the profits from sales in the West are used to give WakaWakas to some of the 1.2 billion people without access to electricity. Replacing kerosene lamps with solar light cuts down on CO2 emissions, reduces health problems like burns, and saves families money. That makes WakaWakas a win-win!

These nifty gadgets have had three crowdfunding campaigns – Kickstart and Symbid for the WakaWaka Light, and again on Kickstarter for WakaWaka Power. Or you can check out the website to buy the gadget yourself.

2. Glowing Plant

Image: WIRED

The boundaries between technology and nature are sometimes hard to define. No more so than with this crowdfunding project, which caused quite a stir last summer when campaigners offered to give away free glowing plants to their Kickstarter backers.

The project seeks to develop sustainable, natural lighting by genetically modifying plants to glow in the dark – but its wild popularity comes from its wacky, science fiction appeal.

The founders describe their crowdfunding success as an exciting new development for synthetic biology, but critics worry about the environmental risks when GMOs are freely distributed. In the wake of this controversy Kickstarter has banned GMOs as rewards, alongside guns and alcohol. Interested people in the US can still pre-order glow-in-the-dark seeds or plants on the Glowing Plant website, but distribution to Europe is illegal under EU law.

3. Wood. Head. Phones.

Image: Inhabitat

Except for the wire inside them, these headphones are made entirely of wood. The inventor, a 19-year-old product designer from Oslo, named them after the Norwegian word “treskalle” – literally meaning “wood head”, or “stupid” – because, as he says in his crowdfunding video, “this is, in a lot of ways, a stupid product”.

In spite of this modesty, the headphones supposedly have a sweet sound and are custom-made for each person in ash, oak, cherry, or walnut. It’s not clear if you can still buy your own Wood. Head. Phones., but the Facebook page is a good place to start looking.

4. Kano

Image: Kano

If you’ve ever wanted the satisfaction of building your own computer, then look no further than Kano. For geeks and newbies of all ages, this cool kit comes with 11 components – including how-to guides – and is cute enough to give mainstream laptops a run for their money.

With Kano you can make games and learn code, and it’s open source, so using it can only get more fun. The smash hit Kickstarter campaign raised 15 times the original goal, and you can find out more or pre-order your own at the Kano website.

5. Morpher

Image: Indiegogo

Do you use a helmet when you cycle? Many people don’t, and this British inventor thinks he’s found one reason why: helmets are too bulky, especially for people using a bike rental scheme. The solution? A folding helmet.

Morpher folds in half, making it easy to slip it into a rucksack or laptop bag. It should be as safe as an ordinary helmet – most of the crowdfunded money will be used to meet international safety standards – and even comes in pretty colours. Check out the Indiegogo campaign or Morpher website for more info.

6. BUILD

Image: Indiegogo

Tired of boring furniture? Well, designers in Germany have developed modular shelving that is non-toxic, long lasting and completely recyclable. Beneath its funky shape lies a high-tech structure of polypropylene plastic foam that also makes it lightweight and shock-absorbent.

With BUILD you decide what shape you want, and can put it on a wall or use it to divide up a room. Plus if you move house or need an extra few chairs for that big dinner party, each block doubles up as a box, a seat, or even a cooler. Check out the Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign, or go straight for the product.

7. ThePresent

Image: thepresent

OMMMMMMMMM.

Relaxed yet? No? Well maybe it’s time to welcome ThePresent into your life. Its New York inventor touts this as the first 365-day clock – in one year the hand only rotates once around the face. With its colourful display to evoke the changing seasons, this clock is a reminder to stop and smell the roses.

The Kickstarter campaign has a great video about how the clock was made. Check out ThePresent website to learn more or get your own.

8. JACK

Image: autoevolution

Between walking and cycling lies a third choice for the eco-friendly commuter: the electric, folding scooter. JACK, as this Dutch prototype is called, weighs less than 20kg, can be charged in a car or home, and fits easily in a car boot or on public transport.

JACK can travel at speeds up to 25kph (15mph), but with a full battery it only lasts 20k (12.5 miles) so it’s more suited to a city spin than a road trip. All the specs are on the Symbid campaign page or the JACK website.

9. Tellspec

Image: Tellspec

If you’re human, you’ve probably worried about what’s in your food at least once. Does that apple have pesticides on it? Are there nasty additives in my pre-packaged sandwich? How many calories are in that slice of cake?

Tellspec hopes to answer these questions. Through spectrometry, Tellspec uses a laser to scan the chemicals inside a piece of food, and then wirelessly sends the results to your smartphone. For anyone with a food allergy, watching their weight or just keen on good food, this is definitely a product to watch. The Indiegogo campaign finished in November, so stay tuned on the website for launch as early as August.

10. Emotiv Insight

Image: Kickstarter

It’s not a jetpack, but it comes pretty close. The Emotiv Insight will allow you to move objects with your mind. With previous models, people have used their thoughts to create music, drive a car, manipulate a robot, type on a keyboard, and operate a wheelchair. This new model, crowdfunded on Kickstart, should also be able to record emotions, stress levels, physical fitness and facial expressions.

Emotiv Insight works through electroencephalography (EEG) to interpret the neuron signals  in the user’s brain. To make it more accessible, designers are making this gadget lightweight and cheaper, and adding dry sensors (so you don’t need to smear gel on your head every time you use it). Whether it’s helping people recover from injury, manage a disability, or just try out something awesome, this gadget screams “watch out, world”.

 

Is there a gadget we’ve left out? Which one would you choose?

fields of gold (CC)
5Erling Hess Johnsen

Erling Hess JohnsenJuly 10, 2013

The future Norwegian farmer

A new research project seeks to investigate whether precision fertilisation may lead to lowering farming costs and reducing climate gas emissions. How? By using a fertiliser drone.

You’ve probably seen lawn mover drones getting more popular as they have become cheaper and more efficient. A similar, though way more advanced drone prototype has been developed by the Norwegian mechatronics company Adigo. The drone moves regularly across the fields and measure which areas need increased fertilisation. Researchers from SINTEF have developed the measuring system based on the gas measurement system SINTEF has developed for the International Space Station.

Over-fertilisation is not only expensive for the farmer, but also bad for the environment. The fertilisation used in the spring time contains nitrogen, which may be transformed into nitrous oxide (NOx). NOx gases are particularly damaging for the local and regional environment.

The fertiliser drone is used as a part of an ongoing international research project administered by Bioforsk. For further reading (in Norwegian), check out Gemini’s article.

What do you think, can increased use of drones be the future for farming?

photo by: marfis75